there's our catastrophe

Work is its own cure. You have to like it better than being loved.

Jul 24 2014

Something J pointed out to me that I think about a lot is that most non-Jews on the Left don’t talk about contemporary anti-Semitism ever, except in the context of ridiculing Jews for suggesting there might be anti-Semitism present in the Left.

I have seen many accusations of anti-Semitism against pro-Palestinian activists (many of whom are Jewish) that I think were made in bad faith. But like, if that’s just the punchline to you to the joke that there’s any anti-Semitism today worth speaking of, then whose point are you really proving?


Jul 22 2014

‘Code of Silence’ is a one-hour observational documentary that follows the parallel journeys of a fervently Orthodox Jewish father and his now-secular son, after the son breaks the code of silence in Melbourne’s Chabad-Lubavitch community going public with his story about being sexually abused as a student. Manny Waks demands the perpetrators be brought to justice, as well as the rabbis, whom he claims covered it up. His father Zephaniah, who claims he has been virtually excommunicated for informing secular authorities, demands his name be publicly cleared.

The documentary will be screened in Australia on ABC1 on 8:30 pm Tuesday 12th August and available for a few weeks on-demand on ABC iView.  If you are outside Australia it’s geo-blocked, but there are a number of proxies you can use to get around that, I’ve used Hola successfully before. 

Manny Waks went on to found the organisation Tzedek, a support and advocacy group for Jewish victims/survivors of child sexual abuse in Australia.  It’s well worth having a look at their website and reading their FAQ.  If you are in Melbourne there will be a live public screening and discussion of this documentary on the 12th August organised by Tzedek.  More info here.  I should note that I don’t know too much about the production company behind this documentary. A lot of their back catalogue is docos with weird ethnically themed fonts, and the promotions for this seems very heavy on the “ooh, weird religious group, scandal” angle which I think is exoticising and unnecessary and at least somewhat anti-Semitic. On the other hand, it’s being promoted by Tzedek, and possibly can contribute to a conversation that needs to happen about the additional barriers to justice faced by victims/survivors of abuse in small, tight-knit religious and ethnic communities. I’m interested to at least watch it and see.


“Most street-smart lesbians who frequented the gay bars knew about undercover agents and tried to take precautions against entrapment, but there was not much that could be done. Perhaps the tyranny of the ‘appropriate’ butch and femme dress in working-class bars can be explained in part by patrons’ fears: A Columbus, Ohio, woman recalls walking into a lesbian bar in the 1950s and finding that no one would speak to her. After some hours the waitress told her it was because of the way she was dressed - no one could tell what her sexual identity was, butch or femme, and they were afraid that if she did not know enough to dress right it was because she was a policewoman.” Lillian Faderman, Odd Girls and Twilight Lovers: A History of Lesbian Life in Twentieth-Century America
(via straightallies)

(via therapsida)


Anonymous said: hey jobhaver I am in Melbourne Australia and I am very afraid of letting people into my house because it's the only place I am safe BUT if there was a trans person at risk of being homeless I would like to offer them my couch, is there any network dedicated to Australia? or anywhere I can let people know that I have a couch that is potentially available?

ifiwakeinthemorning:

jobhaver:

trans housing network accepts submissions from all over the world. most of the submissions we receive are from the united states, canada, and the united kingdom.

you can check http://transhousingnetwork.com/tagged/melbourne to see if there are any “need couch” posts but you can also go to http://transhousingnetwork.com/submit to make a “have couch” post there according to the guidelines on that page

Hello melbourne person! I run a Facebook group called Q Couch Surfing Network Melbourne which is specifically so that queer people can post saying “hey I need a couch to sleep on between ____ and ____” and people can reply and offer theirs. It’s a secret group (so that no one is outed) and it’s completely autonomous so I or someone else in it need to add you, but if you send me your email - the one you log into Facebook with- i can add you without being Facebook friends :)


Jul 21 2014

In high school I had these close guy friends, we’d been friends for years, we’d shared dreams and struggles and all that. and we were all into Buffy and they all liked Xander. and they all ditched me really suddenly as soon as I got my first boyfriend. That’s when I noticed they only kept women around as long as they were either potentially available or could be understood as an honorary guy

and that’s all you need to know about Xander Harris



Jul 20 2014

I’m really suspicious of felting it’s like come on I know that knit just got matted in the wash


Jul 19 2014

Whyyyyy do so many queer people change their actual names to something that places you in a particular relationship to them whether you want it or not

If I have to call you something cute and infantilising, or worse, something like Daddy I’m probably just… Not going to talk to you?

It’s gross and creepy



bintrushd:


“We have a French government that is depriving a group of citizens of its democratic rights,” said Youssef Boussoumah, a teacher at a school on the outskirts of Paris, in a community often qualified as a North African “ghetto.”
For Boussoumah, the decision echoes the Parisian police’s infamous crackdown on demonstrations for Algerian independence on Oct. 17, 1961. Police shot what some historians say was well over 200 protesters and buried them in mass graves.
“We are convinced we are seeing a continuity of colonial and racist policies,” said Boussoumah. “My parents were here at the time of the Oct. 17 [Massacre]. I am convinced that while the circumstances are different … the mentality [that precipitated the events] persists.”
The protest ban may result in a larger legal battle to preserve what one lawyer said was the freedom of expression of French Arabs and Muslims.
“We in France see a situation where Islamophobia is gaining ground,” said Hosni Maati, a lawyer who was set to address Paris police hours later to decry what he called “discrimination against our rights as Arabs and Muslims.”
[…]
“It is necessary that we take action to preserve the rights of French citizens,” Maati said.
Sunday’s pro-Palestine rally was significant for France’s Arab and Muslim communities because many economically, politically and socially disenfranchised youth participated, said Boussoumah.
“It was the first protest for many,” he said. “What are we telling them? ‘You are barbarians and anti-Semites, and you are no longer allowed to come out. You are condemned to watch images of Palestine without being able to express your outrage.’”
[…]
Although Boussoumah indicated that he feels disheartened by the Parisian police’s decision, he said he’s hopeful — for Palestine activism and the French Arab and Muslim communities.
“The fact that they are so afraid to see so many Arabs rising up in society is a source of hope. They act on that fear when they take away our democratic rights,” he said.
He explained that in his parents’ generation, French North Africans were only factory workers. Now North Africans have advanced themselves, where possible, in the arts, sports and sometimes politics.
“That unsettles people,” he said. 

Read more

bintrushd:

“We have a French government that is depriving a group of citizens of its democratic rights,” said Youssef Boussoumah, a teacher at a school on the outskirts of Paris, in a community often qualified as a North African “ghetto.”

For Boussoumah, the decision echoes the Parisian police’s infamous crackdown on demonstrations for Algerian independence on Oct. 17, 1961. Police shot what some historians say was well over 200 protesters and buried them in mass graves.

“We are convinced we are seeing a continuity of colonial and racist policies,” said Boussoumah. “My parents were here at the time of the Oct. 17 [Massacre]. I am convinced that while the circumstances are different … the mentality [that precipitated the events] persists.”

The protest ban may result in a larger legal battle to preserve what one lawyer said was the freedom of expression of French Arabs and Muslims.

“We in France see a situation where Islamophobia is gaining ground,” said Hosni Maati, a lawyer who was set to address Paris police hours later to decry what he called “discrimination against our rights as Arabs and Muslims.”

[…]

“It is necessary that we take action to preserve the rights of French citizens,” Maati said.

Sunday’s pro-Palestine rally was significant for France’s Arab and Muslim communities because many economically, politically and socially disenfranchised youth participated, said Boussoumah.

“It was the first protest for many,” he said. “What are we telling them? ‘You are barbarians and anti-Semites, and you are no longer allowed to come out. You are condemned to watch images of Palestine without being able to express your outrage.’”

[…]

Although Boussoumah indicated that he feels disheartened by the Parisian police’s decision, he said he’s hopeful — for Palestine activism and the French Arab and Muslim communities.

“The fact that they are so afraid to see so many Arabs rising up in society is a source of hope. They act on that fear when they take away our democratic rights,” he said.

He explained that in his parents’ generation, French North Africans were only factory workers. Now North Africans have advanced themselves, where possible, in the arts, sports and sometimes politics.

“That unsettles people,” he said. 

Read more


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